Back to Work

I haven’t posted in a while. Not surprisingly, I have been somewhat occupied. Our new baby requires plenty of work, time, and love. Blogging hasn’t seemed all the important in comparison.

However, I am back on the High Lonesome, which brings with it periods of down time. This time is ripe for blogging.

Being back in the doctor’s role is an interesting transition from new father. Especially, after all the struggle over the last year and a half.

A Baby Brings Perspective

In some ways, I have a newfound acceptance of the failings of medical culture. All the pettiness, greed, and self-importance of many of the actors in a hospital are easier to tolerate, because the reason I show up is so much more important now.

Sometimes the work is its own reward. The times when I actually connect with a patient can sustain me – for a time. The rare critically ill patient who my team triages, treats, and transfers effectively can boost morale and help add meaning to the work.

Nonetheless, the reality is, most of any profession or job is mundane. Having a reason to go to work outside of paying off of my loans and funding my own diversions adds meaning to the mundane – especially when you are paid by the hour.

Knowing that my daughter is home and depends on me adds a certain nobility to the simple paycheck. It helps put a little shine back on the tarnished image medicine has for me.

Yet, on the first day of returning to work at one of my frequent work locations, I end up in my first meeting in over a year. Somehow, we are now having meetings….as locums.

I was scheduled to work and the ED wasn’t busy, so it didn’t turn out to be a big deal.

Of course, the main action item of this meeting was how to improve our billing and reimbursement. After only 3 years in practice, I am almost positive no other kind of meeting exists in healthcare.

This one specifically focused on improving critical care and procedure billing.

Good to be Back!

Other than this inauspicious start, the first day of the shift went fairly well. Going back to a familiar site was a good call for a first shift back. Weirdly, I seemed to actually enjoy being in the hospital.

The hospital had changed the way the local docs rounded in the hospital. This had actually improved communication and the nurses were asking me less questions about patients whom I didn’t know.

Finally, a change whose goal was improving patient care that delivered some results.

The first two patient’s were turfs from clinic for a DVT rule out and a CHF exacerbation. I quickly and efficiently ruled out the DVT. The CHF patient was known to me so the work up and admission to the hospital ended up being fairly straightforward.

Having wrapped up this work, I noticed a lull had set in. I went to the doctor’s quarters in a nearby house to rest and put some space between me and the hospital (it always seems to make the shifts go quicker). I felt good.

Watching some Netflix and making dinner, I waited to be called in. Around 11 pm, I got a call. An ambulance was out for someone who was found down and unresponsive.

An Actual Emergency

I find this chief complaint to be one of the most varied in actual cause. Benzodiazepine overdose, DKA, patient already deceased, sepsis, vasovagal episode, seizure – it could be practically anything.

In small low acuity EDs it tends towards the more mundane. Nonetheless, I headed back the ED and arrived right as the patient was being wheeled into the ED bay.

I recognize her immediately. She is a chronic respiratory disaster.

At 57, She already has end-stage COPD with multiple intubations in the last 12 months. This is, of course, coupled with right-sided heart failure. Shockingly, her kidneys are okay.

Her family has been told multiple times she may never come off the ventilator and she always has – so they now think she always will.

I know her to be angrily, vehemently, and obstinately FULL CODE, despite her terrible chronic disease and inability to care for herself at home.

She has had repeated blood transfusions for anemia which is of unknown source because her respiratory status is too tenuous for endoscopy. Not surprisingly – she also has terrible veins and recently finished a prolonged course of IV antibiotics through a PICC line (which I noticed sadly had already been removed).

“Oh, Shit,” I think to myself.

I look at her on the gurney. She is on a nonrebreathing oxygen mask. Oxygen is actually reading in the high 90s – remarkably good for her. But you can hear her audibly wheezing. Her chest heaves almost off the bed as she breathes in, and then her breath just slowly leaks out.

Her GCS is 3. Yelling, sternal rubs, nail bed pressure – nothing.

Getting to Work

We all get to work. An intraosseus line is placed in one leg – she gives no indication of being aware of a needle being drilled into her tibia. The nurses draw blood and send it to lab.

We give her narcan – she is on a large number of narcotic pain medications. Again no change.

I have the team set up for her intubation as her oxygen levels are starting to drop. Positioning myself at the head of the bed the intubation kit lays ready. I tell the nurse to push the anesthetic, then the anxiolytic, and finally the paralytic. She stops breathing.

Opening her mouth, I slide the laryngoscope into her mouth, visualize the cords, and slide a number eight endotracheal tube into her trachea.

We secure the tube, verify correct position, and begin to breath for her. All in all, it goes pretty well. The chest X-ray shows pulmonary edema, possible infiltrate, ET tube in good position.

Her labs come back, possible sepsis, blood gas shows a PCO2 of 124 prior to intubation. Methamphetamines in her urine. We start sepsis and influenza anti-infectives, give steroids, and get her ready to transport to ICU.

All in all, from arrival to transfer, we do this all in less than 3 hours. Not bad for a family doc in a two-bed emergency department 100 miles from the closest trauma center. Also, it is snowing, so the helicopters won’t fly – she has to go by ground, of course.

The Thrill of Being Present

As she leaves in the ambulance. I am feeling pretty good, alive. We just saved a life – for now. I just spent three hours completely engrossed in something pretty amazing – working as a team with people who gave a shit on something important. It can be intoxicating in small doses.

I like critical care. I like obstetrics (though I don’t deliver babies non-emergently anymore). What I love is the focus on the task at hand. The power of a small group of people fully engrossed in what is happening in that very instant can be amazing.

Both critical care and obstetrics demand this kind of focus. We should all strive for that kind of focus in all aspects of our practice. Sadly, this is difficult given the seemingly coordinated effort to destroy it going on around us.

The High Fades

After a rest and a drink a water, I walk back to get some sleep – it is 2:30 AM after-all. On the walk, I can’t help but feel a tension between the excitement of caring for a critical patient and the ethics of how we spend healthcare dollars in this country.

How many intubations is too many for one person? Is it ethical to repeatedly intubate and, God forbid, actually code someone who lives on death’s doorstep every day?

Does one person have a right to unlimited medical expenditures to prolong their life? How many childhood vaccinations could that cover? How many addiction treatments, or early parenthood interventions could we pay for?

The methamphetamine in her urine and her 3 different narcotic prescriptions are evidence of a life of great suffering. That suffering predated her current illness. Indeed, the smoking and drug use which caused it were likely attempts to numb that suffering for decades.

Is it ethical because these are the patient’s stated wishes? Or are we just hiding behind a weak patient autonomy argument so we don’t have to wrestle the suffering we witness – and prolong.

The things we do to save a life, needles drilled through bone, tubes into bladders and lungs. It would be torture in any other situation.

I feel guilty about how excited I was afterwards – even though I saved her life. I also kind of feel guilty about that…

When is it too much? When is continuing to torture someone to keep them alive, and suffering, unethical – even if they demand you do it?

Are these even questions we can ask in American Healthcare?

Recognition

A week later I get an email from our new ED medical director:

“Doctor HP,

Great job with the care of patient #1234567 in the ED last week. Your documentation of the intubation and critical care time was excellent!

Sincerely,

Your Medical Director”

I sit back and sigh, good to back working again….

2 thoughts on “Back to Work”

  1. “Great job, your documentation was excellent!”.

    Sigh.

    No one writes, “great job, you pulled the fat out of the fire on this one!” Or, “great job, good intubation, good decisions”

    good to have you back. I enjoy your writing. Headed back to the plains tomorrow for 5 weeks myself.

    Congrats on the new baby. Hope your joy continues, and the sorrow from before decreases.

    1. I know, we are seemingly always reminded that we are paid to document that we took care of patients, not to actually take care of patients. It is good to be blogging a bit again. It is nice to use a different part of the brain sometimes. I am glad you enjoy the writing. While I mostly write as a form of cognitive therapy, it helps to know someone else gets something from it.

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