Hemingway and the Danger of Persona

I love reading Hemingway. I am unabashed about my love of his writing. Before everyone freaks out and starts listing all of the problematic aspects of Hemingway when viewed through a modern lens, I am well aware of all of the arguments against Hemingway.

Those arguments are part of the reason I love his writing. Simple, perfect people are useless when it comes to extracting lessons for life. No writer worth reading stays perfect through the centuries.

One of the best parts of reading Hemingway is the existence of a decent companion work which puts nearly every major piece of his work in perspective.

While I could write a book on these various topics, one that I have come to appreciate during my struggle to reclaim my humanity from medicine is the cautionary tale of the Hemingway Persona.

Personality vs Persona

When you read about Hemingway’s early personality the evidence largely points an idealistic, sensitive, and very motivated young artist. He wrote a lot about “manly” pursuits (fishing, hunting, etc) even his early days, but they are almost always a backdrop for extremely human and vulnerable emotional struggles.

Additionally, he drank too much, a common form of self-medication for the overly sensitive in this insensitive world. He was desperate for approval in his professional life and intimacy and adoration in his private life.

Big Two Hearted River illustrates this the best. I read those stories as a form of literary meditation repeatedly the winter after my daughter died. Indeed, I channeled a little of that story into one my posts.

In 1926, he published the The Sun Also Rises to critical acclaim. The literary persona of Jake Barnes (based off of himself), who fished the Basque Pyrenees and dodged bulls in Pamplona, captured the imagination of readers.

From that point on, Hemingway became that persona more and more in public. Over time, the work of putting on the mask invincible masculinity took its toll on Hemingway. It is worth noting that he projected that persona strongest in middle life, when men most acutely have to reckon with their inherent vulnerability.

Hemingway’s public narrative of invincible masculinity became increasingly untenable overtime. This, as well as a genetic predisposition to depression, alcoholism, and chronic pain from injuries in plane crashes led to increasingly deep depressive bouts.

In the end, he killed himself. After a life of building a persona which conflicted so deeply with his underlying personality, this is the only way Hemingway could have died. His public persona could only allow Hemingway to kill Hemingway. No other could have been up to the task.

Does the Doctor kill the Person?

Physicians, arguably more than most common professions, have a strong public image. Strong yet caring, never tiring, cocksure at times, in pursuit of the care of their patients.

Physician culture is very intolerance of aberrancy in this personality type. This is on display in a recent back and forth in the comments by a Douglas Hoy of one of M’s Posts over at Reflections of a Millennial Doctor.

A good portion of my medical school’s non-basic science or clinical education was spent indoctrinating us into the professional image of the physician. We all must wear professional masks. However, the pressure to fully become the mask of the physician is stronger than most.

While I think some people already are or become “the Doctor.” For the rest of us, those who were pretty satisfied with who we were before being physicians, this personality dissonance can be a deep struggle.

As Hemingway’s struggle with his persona show us, if the dissonance is too great, it can be fatal. In many of the stories of physician suicide, people reference this personality vs persona dissonance.

“She was always so happy.”

“Everyone loved him.”

“She was so successful.”

Dissolving the Narrative Dissolves the Self

For many, the risk of “being found out,” or having the persona destroyed is too great a risk. As I have said before, narratives are extremely powerful. We construct ourselves through narrative, if ours is at risk of dissolution, it can seem no different than death itself.

For instance, the country of Macedonia is changing its name to North Macedonia in order to join NATO. The narrative of Macedonia and Alexander the Great being Greek is so important to Greek identity that Greece has blocked Macedonia’s entrance into the organization. And people are still pissed off.

That is how strong narratives are. I am not victim blaming or minimizing the importance of clinical syndromes of Ddepression and anxiety.

However, part of the road to healing is identifying paths and actions we can take to work back towards health. One of those paths is the work of creating a physician persona that is concordant with our native personalities.

As usual, Hemingway says it best in his writing:

“The most painful thing is losing yourself in the process of loving someone too much, and forgetting that you are special too.”

― Ernest Hemingway, Men Without Women

In loving our idea of the doctor more than the person we are, we risk forgetting that we were already special, already worthy.

In the work of healing it is important to continue to be our authentic selves. I believe we will be most effective and keep ourselves and patients safer if we reclaim our humanity and leave our personas at the door.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *